Make Italy Yours

A blog of Italian Culture and Nature

Category: Italian Cities and Towns

Ovid’s birthplace: Sulmona, Abruzzo

KimberlySullivan

Sulmona, Abruzzo, ItalySulmona is a small town in the region of Abruzzo. It is located near one of Abruzzo’s three national parks: the National Park of the Majella.

The town dates back to before the Roman Empire, but it was the era of the Roman Empire in which Sulmona boasted its most famous resident: Publio Ovidio Nasone, best known by most school children as Ovid, the author of the Metamorphosis.

Sulmona, Abruzzo, ItalyOvid was born in Sulmona in 43 B.C. and he achieved great success during his lifetime, until his criticism angered Emperor Augustus, who banished the poet to the outer reaches of teh Empire, in modern-day Romania.

In his verses, Ovid wrote about his hometown: “Sulmo mihi patria est, gelidis uberrimus undis, milia qui novies distat ab Vrbe decem” (Sulmona is my homeland, rich with cool waters, located a distance of 90 miles from Rome.)

Sulmona, Abruzzo, ItalyBut the architecture of  ‘modern’ Sulmona has…

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Postcard from Venice: Traffic over the Grand Canal

Bruno Biancardi

Grand Canal - Morning Traffic Grand Canal – Morning Traffic

I still have a couple of gorgeous photographic spots to share with you from my recent trip to the United States, but now is the time for a postcard from Venice: one of the most classic view of “Canal Grande”.

Location: Accademia Bridge (Ponte dell’Accademia). Together with the Rialto Bridge, the Ponte degli Scalzi, and the new Ponte della Costituzione, by Santiago Calatrava, it is one of the four bridges that cross the Grand Canal, is the major water-traffic corridor of Venice.

What to shoot: From Ponte dell’Accademia you’ll have a vantage point toward part of the Grand Canal with its pompous buildings, the church of Santa Maria della Salute, and Punta della Dogana, where the water of the Canal Grande meets Saint Mark Basin’s ones.

Ideal time to shoot: Sunrise of course, but don’t think to be there alone. This site has become one…

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The Museum City: magical Venice

Adventures in Wonderland



In reference to the previous post, I’ll start by saying I was wrong about the Etrucsan dwellings in Castellina. I did a bit of research. They weren’t dwellings, they were tombs. No wonder they made me shiver. But not so bad really. Glad to realize the possibility that their homes were warmer and lighter than the dark cold stone rooms we went into.

Don did the research for our hotel in Venice. He found one that had good reviews and was only a short walk from the station. It was fairly expensive but he was really clear that that was the one he wanted. It made it all so simple. We got off the train, walked for about three minutes along the main concourse in front of the station, around the first corner into a narrow alley, or calle as they are called, and there was our hotel. We were given…

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Rome’s Captivating Castel Sant’Angelo

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