Make Italy Yours

A blog of Italian Culture and Nature

Category: Italian language

Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi (read by Paolo Poli)

 

Carlo Collodi

Paolo Poli

 

How I (plan to) Study Italian, 2017

Prayers & Piazzas

I have written that, a few years back, I stopped making New Year’s Resolutions, but last week, at the start of a new session of Italian classes, there was a buon proposito waiting for us all:

Migliorare il mio italiano | Improve my Italian

Our professoressa had written this knowing that certainly this a goal for all of her studenti. I nostri compiti (our homework) was to explain specifically how we planned to accomplish this resolution.

Allora, ecco il mio | Here’s mine:

Per migliorare il mio italiano, leggerò, scriverò, ascolterò e parlerò in italiano ogni giorno! 

To improve my Italian, I will read, write, listen and speak in Italian every day!

Reaching way back to my days of teaching language arts to middle schoolers, I remembered that these four elements — reading, writing, listening and speaking — are the foundation of language learning. Reading and listening are…

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Un angelo sul ponte Vecchio

I have written this short story exactly ten years ago. It was for the 40th anniversary of the flood of Florence. I’m sorry I have only in Italian version. http://www.ansa.it/english/news/2016/11/04/florence-marks-50th-anniversary-of-devastating-flood_4ab615f5-3acf-4bb5-a1f6-b99cc64a78d2.html

Oscar

o L’abete bianco

– Stanca? – chiese un uomo d’aspetto nordico con i capelli bianchi, avvicinandosi alla giovane ferma davanti al muricciolo del ponte che guardava in basso, verso l’acqua. Lei si voltò a guardare chi fosse, tirò una boccata alla sigaretta e quando buttò fuori il fumo stava già riguardando l’acqua.

– Che cosa vuole.
– Niente, le chiedevo se era stanca.
– Sì, esatto.
La giovane aveva dato un’altra boccata alla sigaretta e l’aveva gettata di sotto. In silenzio i due la guardarono farsi ingoiare dall’acqua nera, che così sembrava più rigonfia.
– Come mai sola a quest’ora? È già mezzanotte. Vive qui vicino, almeno? – chiese l’uomo strano, in ansia per la sconosciuta.
– Mi lasci in pace.
Ora severa stava guardandolo negli occhi.
– Ha capito? Mi lasci in pace.
– Ha ragione, le chiedo scusa. – disse l’uomo e tacque, senza però muoversi.
La giovane…

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Reasons I love Italy and why I learn Italian

Prayers & Piazzas

Falling in love with the Italian language has been one of the more beautiful surprises of my life.

Growing up in an Italian-American family, with a grandfather who, as a teenager, emigrated from Puglia in southern Italy to America, Italy was no big deal to me. I never intended to learn Italian, and I especially never expected to love every moment of it…read more on Studentessa Matta (honored to be featured there!)

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Let’s Email in Italian – Part 2: Italian Salutations

Conversational Italian!

Here is some information about how to write an email that will help with our latest discussion in the Conversational Italian! Facebook group.

We are talking this week about how to conclude an email or letter. Read below and join the conversation on our Facebook group. I’d love to hear from you!

For more complete details, visit our sister blog, blog.learntravelitalian.com, from which this excerpt was taken. All material is courtesy of Stella Lucente, LLC, and www.learntravelitalian.com.

Italian Salutations for Emails, Texts, and Letters

After we’ve written our email, text, or formal letter, how should we sign off? As you can imagine, this is very different depending on how close the two correspondents are. For two friends, the typical spoken salutations, “ciao” and “ci vediamo,” are commonly used for emails and texts, as are the many idiomatic expressions, such as “a presto” or “a dopo.”

For those who are…

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Amedeo Minghi: L’ Immenso

 

 

Renato Zero: I migliori anni della nostra vita

 

 

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