Make Italy Yours

A blog of Italian Culture and Nature

Category: Reblogged

Save time for Orvieto’s Etruscan Museum

KimberlySullivan

Orvieto Etruscan Museum, ItalyThere’s so much to see when you’re visiting the medieval Umbrian town of Orvieto, that you may forget to stop by the Fondazione Museo Claudio Faina, but that would be  a mistake.

This museum, which houses both the collection of the Faina Counts and Orvieto’s civic collection, is most impressive for its Etruscan objects – this is after all, one of the regions most associated with Etruscan civilization. But there are also impressive items from Ancient Greece and Rome.

Orvieto Etruscan Museum, ItalyAnd the noble home with its frescoed rooms in which the collection is held – just across the piazza from Orvieto’s impressive Duomo, and boasting spectacular views onto the Duomo’s 14th century mosaic facade – is worth the price of admission alone.

Conte Claudio Faina (1875-1954) seems to have been an obsessive collector of Etruscan artifacts.

Orvieto Etruscan Museum, ItalyMany are from nearby Etruscan tombs, but it seems he also had close ties to…

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10 Charming Small Towns in Italy

Finding the veiled Christ in Italy

Sweet Travel

Italy is brimming with religious iconry, churches, crosses and monuments to faith. I have no real Catholic background to draw from so much of it all is mysterious and novel for me.

I am deeply moved by Italians connection to Mary.

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I have been to many churches from Palermo to Milan and places in between. I go for all sorts of reasons: the art, the beauty, the stillness, a chance to have a sit down and for a connection, a feeling, an emotion. There are a few places that stand out for me; they captured me at the time of my visit. I would feel my heart swell.

The veiled Christ sculpture in Cappella Sansevero in Naples was one of those.

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Another was St Paul outside the walls, (san paolo fuori le mura), Santa Maria Maggiore and Saint John Lateran (san giovanni laterano) all in Rome. The domine quo vadis on the…

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Everyday Italian Phrases: Part 2

Conversational Italian!

Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Do you want to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2017?

I believe that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

If we learn how to incorporate “commonly used phrases” when we speak Italian, we will be able to express ourselves more easily and quickly. We will be on our way to building complex sentences and speaking more like we do in our native language!

This post is the second in a series that will originate in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.After our group has had a chance to use these phrases, I will post them on this blog for everyone to try.

Our second “commonly used phrases,” that will help us talk more easily will focus  on  What I asked…”
leading…

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Firenze (Florence) Italy

Travel and Food of Europe Blog

We love Firenze! It is a big and beautiful city. It is Italy. It is the capital of art and architecture in Italy. From the duomo to the ponte vecchio to the views this is an interesting city.

Stop at a bar or small restaurant and enjoy life as it passes by you. Have a cafè, panini, gelato or a glass of wine as you observe life.

Come and walk with us in Firenze in our video below and see this wonderful city…

– George

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How I (plan to) Study Italian, 2017

Prayers & Piazzas

I have written that, a few years back, I stopped making New Year’s Resolutions, but last week, at the start of a new session of Italian classes, there was a buon proposito waiting for us all:

Migliorare il mio italiano | Improve my Italian

Our professoressa had written this knowing that certainly this a goal for all of her studenti. I nostri compiti (our homework) was to explain specifically how we planned to accomplish this resolution.

Allora, ecco il mio | Here’s mine:

Per migliorare il mio italiano, leggerò, scriverò, ascolterò e parlerò in italiano ogni giorno! 

To improve my Italian, I will read, write, listen and speak in Italian every day!

Reaching way back to my days of teaching language arts to middle schoolers, I remembered that these four elements — reading, writing, listening and speaking — are the foundation of language learning. Reading and listening are…

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Sonata per viola

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