Make Italy Yours

A blog of Italian Culture and Nature

Category: Reblogged

MASSIMO BOTTURI – PIRATI

Ad alta voce / En voz alta

Massimo Botturi ©
PIRATI
Lettura di Luigi Maria Corsanico

Opera pittorica di Edgar Caracristi ©

Denis Azabagic / Prelude 4, Heitor Villa Lobos

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PIRATI©  di Massimo Botturi
  da qui: https://massimobotturi.wordpress.com/2017/08/13/pirati/

Maria era sempre incinta.
Gridava come i corvi tra gli alberi
a noi tutti, venuti a far la conta
in quell’angolo di casa
da dove usciva odore di arrosto, e rosmarino.
Le ho vedute
le isole ancorate più a largo di Milano
i caseggiati mezzi scrostati, e poi i ponteggi
mangrovie dove uomini nudi vecchio Sud
tingevano le mura di cielo.
Ho visto i mari
i suoi caleidoscopi nel pozzo
e seppellito, nel cuore di un’amica la mappa del tesoro.
Son stato capitano di spada e di robinia
spesso solo, fino al tramonto d’ogni speranza
d’ogni indugio.
Ho fatto buona pesca di api e di mosconi
in laghi di mastelli di zinco. E avuto figli
sparati per il…

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The Englishwoman visits Senigallia’s Biblioteca Antonelliana. Part I: Manuscripts.

Libraries and rare books in Le Marche

Senigallia is a pleasant resort town. As well as its lively Lungomare (Promenade) and its Spiaggia di Velluto (velvet beach), it boasts an attractive old town and a fine communal library.

It is much easier to explain face to face, rather than on the telephone, who I am; a British librarian, and what I want to do; spread awareness of the bibliographic treasures of Le Marche. So it was easy to book an appointment to look at some of the manuscripts and rare books in Senigallia’s  library, and return a day or two later, as Senigallia is just down the road from us. The staff were most welcoming and helpful. The conditions were not the best for photography, but I thought you’d like to see the manuscripts anyway.

The Biblioteca Antonelliana is called after Cardinal Antonelli, its founder, who in 1767 left all his books to the public administration of…

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The Englishwoman visits Offagna

Hill towns of Le Marche, Italy

I’ve been silent for some time because my family was keeping me busy. I am freer now, and looking forward to sharing more about life in Le Marche.

Offagna is a good place to visit if you have just been to  IKEA and want to enjoy somewhere uniquely Marchigiano. Or if you are touring it’s convenient for Ancona, but a different world.

We drove along winding hilly roads with breathtaking views on either side, and adopted our usual technique of not studying the map but parking just under the walls – there’s always somewhere – going through the gate, and walking up towards the Rocca, or castle. Most  hill towns have them and when we took our girls round them, we tended to grade them according to the size of the Rocca. Corinaldo hasn’t got one at all, Mondavio’s is one of the best, and Offagna’s is impressive too.

The…

View original post 787 more words

Luigi Maria Corsanico legge Marcello Comitini

La poesia e lo spirito

da qui

Marcello Comitini
Il miele dei ricordi

Lettura di Luigi Maria Corsanico

Francis Lai – Le passager de la pluie
Immagini dal web di propietà degli autori

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How I would See Italy

Travel in Italy Blog

People always ask me, “What order would you see places in Italy?” All of Italy is great! You can not make a bad decision! Everyone that has been there has an opinion. This BLOG/VLOG is mine. I would see the famous big cities first because they are important. So the order would be:

  • Rome
  • Florence
  • Venice
  • Naples

But Milan, Siena, San Gimignano, Positano, Capri … are also important places to see.

The only rules I have are:

  1. Take your time in each place. Don’t rush and try to see all of Italy in a single trip. You will only see the inside of busses and trains.
  2. Sit at outside bars or trattorias and observe the people (non tourists) around you. Begin to understand Italian life.
  3. Try to communicate with locals.
  4. After the big cities, go to small resorts and mountain towns.
  5. Eat where the locals eat. DON’T EAT AT TOURISTY…

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Stretching my legs with a passeggiata in Sora, Italy

kimberlysullivan

Sora, Lazio, ItalyI’ve long been curious to visit the town of Sora, in Italy’s Lazio region and located in the province of Frosinone – just along the border with Abruzzo.

Since it’s a little off the beaten trail from the surrounding areas I visit more often (including the wonderful Parco Nazionale d’Abruzzo), I’ve never managed to get there.

Sora, Lazio, ItalyThis summer, however, as I was dropping one child off at tennis camp in Abruzzo and picking up another at running camp in the southernmost point in Lazio, I noticed that the long trip between the two destinations happened to take me by Sora.

Sora, Lazio, ItalyAnd so I finally visited the town on a sunny Sunday in July – and after all the driving behind me and all that ahead of me, it was the perfect excuse to park, stretch my legs and explore the town.

This town with a population of a little over…

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#ItalophiliaPostcards

Italophilia

In the past 3-4 years of blogging and social media, I have fostered many online friendships and am truly grateful for that. Some of them have turned into real life meetings in Italy/India and that is a testament to the amazing journey that blogging has given me.

Improving online relationships and getting to know my followers/friends has been a lot of fun. So keeping it alive, I have merged the old and new traditions with #ItalophiliaPostcards.

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