Make Italy Yours

A blog of Italian Culture and Nature

Category: Reblogged

April 25, Resistance and Bella Ciao. A Musical Journey

ALMOST ITALIAN

Australians and New Zealanders will be celebrating ANZAC Day today, a national holiday which commemorates all Australians and New Zealanders who served and died in wars and conflicts, with a particular focus on the landing of the ANZACs at Gallipoli, Turkey on April 25 1915. Coincidentally, April 25 is also significant in the Italian calendar as it marks the Festa Della Liberazione (Liberation Day), also known as Anniversario della Resistenza (Anniversary of the Resistance), an Italian national holiday. Italian Liberation Day commemorates the end of the Italian Civil War, the partisans who fought in the Resistance, and the end of Nazi occupation of the country during WW2. In most Italian cities, the day will include marches and parades. Most of the Partisans and Italian veterans of WW2 are now deceased: very few Italians would have first hand memories of that era.

One of the more accessible documents from the partigiani era of the 1940s…

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April blossoms and spring in the Lagoon of Venice

La Venessiana

Spring in Venice comes early and you can notice its first signs by mid-February. It’s not just the narcissi and primrose plants you see pop up in the fiorerie (flower stores) and on the balconies, it’s the season of mimosa blossoming (take a look at mimosa pictures in Venice in this blog article).

March and April bring on unstable weather in the first six weeks, with bouts of rain and even nightly thunderstorms transporting a moist and warm breeze from the South Western Mediterranean. What we consider unpredictable is a boon to our plants, and they really get greener every day! One morning you open your windows and get the view I did in the title picture of this blog post. The light takes on a special sparking quality and makes you want to eat breakfast on the terrace overlooking Rio di San Provolo … but it was a little too chilly at…

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Craco ( Matera-Basilicata ) Paese di pietre e sassi- Le fiabe che vanno scomparendo -Country of rocks and stones-The fairy tales that are disappearing

ventisqueras

tsb12762se il tempo fosse polvere per i nostri occhi non ci sarebbe  nessuna misericordia, ma il tempo costruisce la polvere sugli uomini e sulle cose per mantenerle in bilico nella memoria…poi un soffio di vento le disperde ancora e per sempre

castelmezzano1200

immobile nell’abbraccio di potenti spuntoni rocciosi immobile nel tempo : Craco  ( Cracun o Graculum, dal significato in latino” piccolo campo di grano” ) nome ricevuto quando se ne hanno le prime certe notizie storiche dall’arcivescovo Amaldo di Tricarico circa nel 1060, è uno dei cosiddetti paesi fantasma, cui ho dedicato una particolare posizione nel mio blog denominandoli ” Le fiabe che vanno scomparendo ”

dsc_7177-arrivo-a-cracosono circa 6.000 in tutta la penisola perlopiù piccoli agglomerati di case o piccolissimi borghi la maggior parte siti tra le montagne o sulle colline, abbandonati dagli abitanti nel corso degli anni o dei secoli  per varie cause, frane, smottamenti, terremoti

397090gli abitanti emigrati…

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Venice: Boat Building, Bridge Fights and a Boat Legend

Under Western Skies

As I was researching locations for the recent Part 4 of Ye Bigge Sleepe, I concentrated on the Dorsoduro portion of Venice, because the Università Ca’ Foscari, one of the places that figured in the story is there. That jogged a memory from a walk The Counselor and I took there one afternoon, with only a general idea of a destination in mind.

We encountered this scene:

squero-di-san-trovaso-brad-nixon-2000

We’d happened upon Lo Squero di San Trovaso: “The Boat Builders of San Trovaso.”

In numerous trips to Venice, we’d seen hundreds of boats and ridden in a few, including gondolas. I’d never seriously wondered where gondolas come from, but that’s one place.

The boatyard is marked with a red flag near the bottom center of the map:

dorsoduro-map-marked

According to their website, the squero has been there since at least the 17th Century. The wooden architecture of the boatyard buildings isn’t typically…

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How to fall in love with Verona in one easy step

Prayers and Piazzas

If the universe had commissioned Walt Disney to create Italy, what he would have crafted, in my opinion, would have looked like today’s Verona. Verona is that exquisite, and magical.

File:20110720 Verona 3078.jpg

Verona Image Credit

Apparently I’m not the only one who feels this way. The entire city of Verona has been named one of UNESCO’s World Heritage sites. Often, a UNESCO site is something more specific, such as the church in Milan which houses Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, or the ancient dwellings known as trulli in Puglia’s Alberobello. Many Italian cities, such as Florence, Siena and Naples, do find themselves on the heritage list, but it is specifically for their historic city centers (i centri storici). In Verona, the UNESCO powers that be found the city’s urban structure and architecture so captivating, that they honored the entire city with World Heritage status.

Falling in…

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Cute church on Ischia

Bagni di Lucca and Beyond

In spring this year we spent a couple of days on gorgeous Ischia, one of the islands in the spectacular Bay of Naples. Our lovely friends Stephanie and Paul took us on a tour of the island on a rickety bus which hurtled around the narrow road at breakneck speed.

One of the highlights along the way was the pretty little church, Santa Maria del Soccorso, which sits on a promontory jutting into the sea, Punta del Soccorso.

Ischia

image

The facade is a mix of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque styles. The church has had many transformations since it was rescued from an old Augustinian monastery founded in the 14th century.

Ischia

The entrance is via a semicircular staircase decorated with polychrome majolica tiles.

Ischia

The tiles are repeated in the wall around the church and on the cross at the side.

Ischia

Ischia

Ischia

Ischia

Ischia

The interior is a cool respite from the heat of the day.

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Italian Past Tense Verbs to Use EVERY Day!

Conversational Italian!

Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Do you want to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2017?

I believe that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

If we learn how to incorporate “commonly used phrases” when we speak Italian, we will be able to express ourselves more easily and quickly. We will be on our way to building complex sentences and speaking more like we do in our native language!

This post is the third in a series that will originate in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.After our group has had a chance to use these phrases, I will post them on this blog for everyone to try.

Our third  series of “commonly used phrases,” that will help us talk more easily will build on the phrase structure used…

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